California drought

Pulling Water Out of Thin Air

March 22nd marked World Water Day, an annual United Nations observance aimed at tackling the global water crisis. This year’s theme, “leaving no one behind,” focused specifically on U.N. Sustainable Development Goal 6:  access to safe and affordable drinking water for all by 2030.

With the wide-spread scarcity of safe drinking water supplies, one might wish it were possible to pull water out of thin air—and that’s exactly what one company has done.

CA Snowpack Packs a Punch

California’s snowpack is now over 136% and rising, with more snow expected this weekend. Is it enough to defeat the drought?

When the Smoke Clears: Aftereffects of Wildfires on Communities’ Water Quality

It is impossible to overstate the tragedy of the Camp and Woolsey fires. The road to recovery will be a long, expensive, and painful one and, unfortunately, rebuilding is only the first of many costs. In addition to the obvious aftermath of a wildfire, there is a subtle yet salient issue these communities will now face: tainted water quality.

Winter Forecast: A Strong Chance of El Niño

Weather experts say the conditions are ripe for a winter El Niño that would bring rain to the south and above-average temperatures to the north.

Cultivating Conservation: Winning Strategies for Water Agencies

California water agencies face increasing pressure to promote and implement sustainable water conservation practices. But as the old saying goes, “old habits die hard.” So what motivates people to use less water?

From the Ashes: Wildfire Effects on Water Quality

A parched preceding year paired with exceptionally hot summer months set California up for a disastrous and historic 2018 fire season. So far in 2018, Cal Fire has recorded over 876,400 acres burned. That’s more than four times the acreage burned compared to this time last year, which Cal Fire reported as just over 228,800 acres.

It is obvious that these fires are a threat to people, wildlife, structures, and our heroic firefighters, but what is less obvious is the danger they pose to our water quality.